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Forts & Monuments

Goa Tourism Guide > Goa > Forts & Monuments

 
CHAPORA FORT
This fort was built by the Adil Shah of Bijapur on the southern headland of the Chapora river. It was known as Shapur and is now mostly ruined. It has a commanding view of the Vagator beach and is near to Anjuna beach.


 
MORMUGAO FORT
This fort near the internationally famous Mormugao Harbour was built to protect the harbour situated near the Vasco da Gama town. Its work started in 1624. It covered an area of six miles in circumference, contained towering bulwarks, three magazines, five prisons, a chapel and quarters for the guard. It had 53 guns and a garrison with 4 officers, and was an important fortress on the western coast. However, except the chapel and a portion of the boundary wall, little is left of this fort.
 
TERACOL (TIRACOL) FORT
It was a key Portuguese fort for the defence of Goa, on the north side of the estuary of the Tiracol river, the most northern boundary of Goa. This fort is marked by decorative turrets and dry moat with commanding views of the estuary and ocean. The church set in the middle of the fortress has a classical late Goan façade. The fort presently houses a tourist hotel. The beach is situated at the confluence of river and sea and generally recognised for its tranquility.
 
THE GATE OF THE COLLEGE OF ST. PAUL
The College of St. Paul, once the principal institution of Jesuits in India for imparting knowledge on Christianity, was built over the ruins of a mosque south of St. Cajetan’s church at Old Goa in 1542. However, it was abandoned during the outbreak of plague in 1570 and went into disuse. The Government demolished this ruining structure in 1832 to carry materials for building construction in Panaji. The only remnant of this College is the façade in the shape of an arch with a niche at the top and a cross crowning it. The arch that led to the College as a gateway is built of laterite, flanked on either side by a basalt column of the Corinthian order on raised plinth, and supported by basalt pilasters of the Doric order.
THE GATE OF THE PALACE OF ADIL SHAH
The palace of Adil Shah at Old Goa was the most prominent building with magnificent lofty staircases. It was the residence of the Portuguese governors till 1695, and was afterwards used by them on festive occasions. It was deserted during the epidemic in the 18th century, was demolished in 1820 and the materials carried to Panaji for construction of houses. Now only the gate remains which is architecturally purely brahminical in style. Six steps in front of the gate lead to the raised platform on which the gate stands.
 
THE TOWER OF THE CHURCH OF ST. AUGUSTINE
Built in 1602, the only ruin of the Church of St. Augustine on the Holy Hill at Old Goa near the Nunnery, is a lofty 46-metre high tower defying the torrential rains. The tower is one of the four of St. Augustine Church that once stood there. The Church when intact was perhaps the biggest in Goa. With the religious suppression in 1835, the Augustinians deserted the church and the convent. The neglect resulted in the collapse of the vault on September 8, 1842. The façade and half of the tower fell in 1931 and some more parts of it collapsed in 1938.
 
THE VICEROY’S ARCH
It is one of the gates of Adil Shah’s Fort at Old Goa. It was renovated by the Portuguese and was the gateway to Goa for Portuguese Governors. Every incoming Viceroy used to disembark at this place. The arch was rebuilt by the Governor Francisco de Gama (1597-1600) in the memory of his great-grandfather Vasco da Gama. It was again completely re-built in 1954.
 
 

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